It's Not Cold Fusion, but...

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It's Not Cold Fusion, but...

Postby re-rose rose » Mon Dec 12, 2016 7:35 pm

This is an exciting turn of events that have emerged from the "cold fusion" announcement in 1989.

"The Widom-Larsen theory offers a plausible explanation—localized conversion of gamma radiation to infrared radiation. The implication is that immense technological opportunities may exist if a practical source of energy can be developed from these laboratory curiosities.

Perhaps most surprising is that, in the formative years of atomic science in the early 20th century, some scientists reported inexplicable experimental evidence of elemental transmutations. In the 1910s and 1920s, this research was reported in popular newspapers and magazines, and papers were published in the top scientific journals of the day, including Physical Review, Science and Nature. The experiments, using relatively simple, low-energy benchtop apparatus, did not use radioactive sources so the results defied prevailing theory. Several researchers independently detected the production of the gases helium-4, neon, argon, and an as-yet-unidentified element of mass-3, which we now identify as tritium. Two of these researchers were Nobel laureates."


https://blogs.scientificamerican.com/gu ... something/

Seems like I recall tritrium being mentioned in some Townsend document or another.
Was it in Winterhaven/aka Proposal for a Space Vehicle? (Mark Moody mentioned it, I think)

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Re: It's Not Cold Fusion, but...

Postby nate » Tue Dec 13, 2016 10:03 pm

re-rose rose wrote:This is an exciting turn of events that have emerged from the "cold fusion" announcement in 1989.


Wow! This is very cool, Rose. Scientific American are the heavy hammer of skepticism on this subject. If even THEY are reporting on LENR-CANR, it must have got really big. (I've been following the scene, from a distance, ever since 1989 and the knee-jerk denials have got really, really old.)

The Widom-Larsen theory has nothing to do with fusion; the key steps are based on weak interactions and are consistent with existing physics. The theory explains how nuclear reactions can occur at or near room temperature through the creation of ultra-low-momentum neutrons and subsequent neutron-capture processes. Such neutrons, according to the theory, have a very large DeBroglie wavelength and therefore have a huge capture cross-section, explaining why so few neutrons are detected.


That seems.. interesting? A sort of macroscopic quantum effect then? And this might be a small step inwards to imagining nuclear transmutation occurring in biological systems, as we've heard whispers about for decades now?

Seems like I recall tritrium being mentioned in some Townsend document or another.
Was it in Winterhaven/aka Proposal for a Space Vehicle? (Mark Moody mentioned it, I think)


Possibly! I can never quite remember all the Winterhaven details; I recall a proposal for some sort of ionization by radioactive isotope but thought it was cesium. Not sure tritium would be best suited for a space vehicle - its a gas, so a whiff of vacuum and whoops it's all gone.

Tritium was used in aircraft emergency lights for a long time (may still be for all I know). I guess it would be a beta emitter, spitting out an electron to decay to H2? (Not much of an alpha to emit with that tiny nucleus). Had to be sealed in a glass tube with a phosphor; the glass blocked the betas as they do for TV tubes. It had a fairly short half-life, though, on the order of months, so you'd not want to be out in deep space when you needed a recharge.

My favourite gaseous radioactive isotope - which would also make an awesome retro-synthpop band name is - Krypton-85, because of these cool things:
https://www.fourmilab.ch/etexts/leesona ... r_battery/

Atomic batteries to power - turbines to speed! https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Atomic_battery

Regards, Nate
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Re: It's Not Cold Fusion, but...

Postby re-rose rose » Wed Dec 14, 2016 5:52 pm

Nate,

I guess it wasn't tritrium then, but some other element that had been missing from the scale,that has since been found, speculated by some to be the same Element 115 mentioned by Bob Lazaar.


I love the fact that a reputable publication has at last reported on low energy transmutation observed in serious labs in the early years of the last century. I don't love the fact that these stories were dismissed or ignored by "real" science for a hundred years.

But now we can talk about them again, because LENR sounds so much more legitimate than Alchemy. However, I have a friend who studied with Frater Albertus at the Paracelsus Institute, who swears that he observed an elemental transmutation in his own lab. I can't remember from what to what...I'll ask him when I see him again.

Judging by Amazon entries, the Alchemical tradition is thriving, at least here in the US.

This book, written by another former student of Albertus' school, seems to be the most comprehensive of the new crop: The Path of Alchemy: Energetic Healing & the World of Natural Magic (Pathways to Enlightenment)

https://www.amazon.com/Path-Alchemy-Ene ... 0738709034

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Re: It's Not Cold Fusion, but...

Postby nate » Wed Dec 14, 2016 8:29 pm

re-rose rose wrote:I love the fact that a reputable publication has at last reported on low energy transmutation observed in serious labs in the early years of the last century. I don't love the fact that these stories were dismissed or ignored by "real" science for a hundred years.

But now we can talk about them again, because LENR sounds so much more legitimate than Alchemy. However, I have a friend who studied with Frater Albertus at the Paracelsus Institute, who swears that he observed an elemental transmutation in his own lab. I can't remember from what to what...I'll ask him when I see him again.


Cool! I'm trying to remember who it was I was recently reading who believed in atomic transmutation in living systems. I think it may have been Andrija Puharich? It would explain quite some things, I think, if eg plants or oysters could tweak elements just a bit to get exactly what they need even if they don't have quite the right minerals coming in. If there's any possible way of doing such transmutations at low energies, you can bet life will be exploiting it. A bit like how we're now discovering chlorophyll cells use a quantum effect. (eg http://arstechnica.com/science/2011/12/ ... synthesis/ )

But then I believe in 'faith healing miracles' since I have close friends who've seen them happen - large-scale tissue restructuring, in realtime - and I don't have any clue what the physical mechanism of the transformation is. I just believe there must be one, and a 'human biofield' seems like the best explanation to me. Some way that atoms themselves are merely manifestations of an underlying energy we can't quite measure directly. Because presumably if someone sees tissue grow before their eyes there must be atoms being generated from 'nothing', with a whole bunch of information being dumped in to control the process, and yet there's no radiation or heat (just a slight sense of warmth or tingling reported by the experiencer). Would love a scientist to catch one of these events under an MRI scanner! Sadly, they're very hard to recreate on demand in lab conditions. (Also, the 'faith healing' culture for a century has tended to model itself on showbiz rather than science, which is problematic in a whole bunch of other ways.)

Regards, Nate
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Re: It's Not Cold Fusion, but...

Postby fruitbat » Fri Dec 16, 2016 1:35 am

"Large scale tissue restructuring", via laying on of hands is a real thing? Who'd a thunk it!
Seriously interesting post there, nate, please keep 'em coming!

I'd read about faith healing in the newspapers as a kid, and now you have reminded me, there should be some fine examples to witness on "youtube".
Everybody has a video camera nowadays built into their phone, some of the new ones are of astounding quality too.
The truth of many things is becoming apparent precisely because people can whip out their phone and get the video evidence.
Although of course, you can't believe your eyes when it comes to digital trickery done by the talented, it's also apparent that at least some of the truth stands out, as indeed it should, on it's own merits and simply needs to be viewed in order to broaden ones horizons. This modern age isn't ALL bad!

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Re: It's Not Cold Fusion, but...

Postby nate » Sun Dec 18, 2016 9:38 am

fruitbat wrote:"Large scale tissue restructuring", via laying on of hands is a real thing? Who'd a thunk it!
Seriously interesting post there, nate, please keep 'em coming!


I believe, so, yes. But I don't really have any scientific proof. Cases of rapid before-your-eyes healing involving what would seem to be accelerated tissue regrowth (eg, a limb growing again, or scar tissue being erased) are very rare and hard to capture. I wish I could say I've seen such dramatic healings, but I haven't personally. But I do have a brother who preaches and says he's seen some dramatic healings occur at his meetings. He says he can't control when or what happens - 'God does that, I don't' - but sometimes gets a 'feeling' or a mental image (like, eg, a kind of temporary, sympathetic pain in his body that indicates where someone might be about to receive a healing. The one case of his I do know of - I've met the person involved - was a kind of fused bone syndrome that instantly recovered, eg, within minutes of prayer. This one was medically confirmed, and years later the person is still healed. No idea how it happened but I assume that it must have involved some kind of cellular regeneration - and the scientific answer I think would probably be that the human body/mind is capable of vastly more self-repair than we generally realise. Maybe 'God does it' or maybe the human mind does it or maybe there's a continuum between these concepts.

Like most healing preachers, my brother has no theory for what causes healings to happen and why some people get healed while many don't. It certainly has nothing to do with the person's level of faith or their lifestyle or the style of prayer or really anything. It just sometimes happens and sometimes not. The old-school Pentecostal 'showbiz' model was always to get a crowd hyped to emotional fever-pitch in the hope that this would 'raise the level of faith in the room' and allow something to happen; but my brother says that's really unnecessary. Even the 'laying on of hands' isn't always needed. A few words of quiet prayer will do it, if it's going to happen at all. He usually doesn't focus on healings just because he knows they're not reliable. He *lets* them happen but doesn't try to *make* them happen, if that makes sense.

These phenomena seems to go in historical waves, not unlike UFO flaps. I believe the Christian Scientists and early Pentecostals saw this kind of stuff happen quite a bit in the late 1800s and early 1900s; then the Charismatics in the 1960s-70s; then a few other churches like the Vineyard in the 1980s-90s. However the 'stuff' seems to go away eventually, and nobody ever I think really gets a handle on exactly 'how to make it happen'. Perhaps this is because the powers behind the healing (whether one considers them to be 'angels', 'spirits' or 'God') don't want us chasing miracles as a goal.

Sadly, some of the healing movements do seem to have a dark side: they can become quite controlling and treat people very badly in an attempt to force miracles to happen, or pretend they're happening when they aren't, or use them as a bait-and-switch to entice people to join their organisation, and can at their worst turn very cult-like. That happened to Christian Science (in its early years at least), and I fear it's also happened to Bethel Church, which is the current darling of the Evangelical-Charismatic-Pentecostal 'healing prayer' scene. I have serious concerns about Bethel because I believe they've faked miracles or at least are not very particular about the quality of their reporting.

Another downside to the Christian healing scene is that evangelists and preachers aren't always very interested in scientific evaluation, and aren't always open to thinking about faith healing stories from other religious traditions, of which there are many. A retired liberal Anglican vicar friend of mine has a website where he's been blogging for years about this whole paranormal ball of wax and how it might interact with religion, but I feel like he's probably an outlier. http://www.thegroundoffaith.net/

Although I can't heal anyone on demand, I *can* do the Pentecostal trick of 'speaking in tongues' (glossolalia) which, like spoon-bending, seems to be a transferable psychic ability that's not amazingly useful in real life. I picked this ability up years back at a Bible camp. It's hard to describe how it works but once having learned it, if I start speaking one of the syllables I already know, the next syllables will form directly in my mouth muscles as I speak them. Like, it bypasses that whole 'preparing to think of a word and then say it' mental pathway - it even involves consonants I don't have in English. I can start or stop this at any time, it doesn't 'take over' in any way: though I do have to at least subvocalise the syllables and if I try to consciously focus on them the unconscious process seems to get blocked. The syllable pattern is short, in a language I don't know, and feels like some kind of rehearsed liturgy or mantra, well worn by the speaker. I'd love to get it analyzed by a linguist but never have.

The general Pentecostal belief is that this is a form of prayer and that's exactly how it feels to me; there's an emotion attached to the syllables that feels 'prayer-like'. I don't think they're random words. A non-Pentecostal belief might be that glossolalia is some kind of limited past-life recall and who knows, that might also work.

Regards, Nate
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Re: It's Not Cold Fusion, but...

Postby re-rose rose » Sun Dec 18, 2016 5:33 pm

Thanks for sharing that story, Nate. Have you recorded your speech? Is the word/syllable order and cadence the same each time?

There are so many possibilities as to why you have this ability, almost none provable.
Since I have been thinking about DNA this morning, I like to fancy the idea that you are vocalizing some genetic code. How cool would it be if we found that voice transcriptions of different code segments all came imbued with some worshipful quality!

But on a more mundane level, it might be informative to look at an EEG taken before and after you trigger the sound flow.

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Re: It's Not Cold Fusion, but...

Postby nate » Mon Dec 19, 2016 9:47 am

re-rose rose wrote:Thanks for sharing that story, Nate. Have you recorded your speech? Is the word/syllable order and cadence the same each time?


I think I tried recording it once, but didn't do anything with it.

The syllable order and cadence vary; they feel as if I'm saying them, as if they mean something. The syllables appear to come pre-loaded with some kind of emotional meaning. They don't come with a cognitive meaning, though. They come out very fast, I guess about the speed of someone who was deeply fluent in the language. Not quite like reciting a set text, but a set of phrases. The words vary organically but return; they only use the same recurring set of words, mostly, unless the sense shifts. So I figure something like a rapidly spoken prayer. But there's a sense of awakening or calling to something deep inside. It's literally located in my body: a sort of lightness in my... stomach? Or solar plexus? Or heart region, anyway. Chest somewhere.

It feels a bit... Russian? Or Jewish. Or Middle-Eastern. I don't know. It has consonants I don't speak in English. A sort of throaty hard 'kch' sound. An L/R confusion which I thought only happened in Chinese, but apparently not.

I'm transliterating phonetically here; the ' means it's a kind of rapid unvoiced non-vowel.

l'koi l'm b' brlaka <-- this seems like the core, an invocation of some kind. Baraka means blessing, I think, in Jewish or Sufi? That rl sound is like a rolled r; quite hard to pin down. The r is tongue down, the l is tongue up, I think? This is one of the consonants which isn't 'natural' to me, yet when I'm doing this it *feels* natural. As if... I'm not just borrowing some words but I'm borrowing/sharing an entire personality, but only for the purpose of those words, if that makes any sense? Like in a videogame where your actions come with a character attached, these 'actions' (and it's like I'm just pushing one button, the 'next word' button... I had a Casio keyboard which did that once, you could memorise a song and play it back note by note by pushing one button.. this feels like that) seem to come with a person attached? Only that person is me, but not the me *here*, in this life...

l'm b' brsh n'ykai
l'm b' brlaka
l'm b' blr' koi
l'm b' blr' koi
l'm b' brlaka
l'm b' brsh n'ykai
l'm b' brlaka
l'm b' brlak l'yka
l'm b' brsh n'ykai
l'k nykai
l'm b' blr' koi
l'm b' brsh n'ykai
l'm b' brlak y'kha
l'm b' brlak l'k y'kha
l'm b' blr' koi
l'm b' brlaka
l'k yk'hai
l'm b' broush y'khay
l'k y'h hum b'laka


So it repeats, a very few words, but not robotically. It feels like variations on a phrase, as if the suffixes are modifiers, maybe. Slightly different pronunciations of the vowels from time to time.
Like, 'L'm b' brlak' is one form, the modfied 'brlAKa' has an emphasis on the 'AK' as if it's a full stop or underline, and then the 'a' is a suffix?

... and then it sometimes may spin out into a set of completely different phrases, sometimes very fast, with quite a different 'feeling' to it. While the 'main' mode feels... serious? The other one is a bubbly sort of feeling:

l'm b b'rata
k'm b b'lika (there's an oddly uplifting feeling to this phrase. The 'ee' literally lilts upward and there's a soft emphasis on it, it's held a little longer than the other syllables. It must be a related/companion word to 'b'laka')

l'm b b'loosh n'ykay

and yet returning to

k'm b b'rlaka

Different 'set phrases' but they all seems to be part of the same language. Like, 'l'm' must be one word (a verb?) and 'k'm' a related one; they both apply to that 'baraka' variant.

What language has a hard throaty 'kch' but also an 'oosh' (as in 'babooshka' in Russian?) and a 'n'yk' ? Feeling vaguely Russian-ish to me but... I don't speak Russian.

Or else it's just some random neurons firing, a Markov generator in my brain, but... it *feels* meaningful. Would it come with such clear emotion attached if it were literal random nonsense?


There are so many possibilities as to why you have this ability, almost none provable.


Well, it's an ability shared by thousands, possibly millions of Pentecostal-Charismatic practitioners, I think. It was very popular in the 1970s to 1990s; perhaps it's gone out of fashion today? There probably have been scientific studies on it, but for some reason I've felt a bit... shy about seeking them out.

Since I have been thinking about DNA this morning, I like to fancy the idea that you are vocalizing some genetic code. How cool would it be if we found that voice transcriptions of different code segments all came imbued with some worshipful quality!


It feels ancient, I think, though I can't say for sure why I think that. Well-worn, rather? But definitely human. It must fit into the family of human languages somewhere, and I'd figure Semitic of some kind.

But on a more mundane level, it might be informative to look at an EEG taken before and after you trigger the sound flow.


That could be interesting, yes. It does seem to trigger a kind of meditative feeling, though it's almost an active meditation. It's not a 'slowing your mind down' meditation; it requires conscious assent to every syllable, and the flow just... stops if I don't feel comfortable. Or if it feels like whatever I'm saying is 'done'. Beyond a certain point it just shuts down. Or my body gets the feeling that I 'want' to stop.

I think the psychic/motor mechanism involved in this ability is basically the same as in 'automatic writing' - at least, from my reading of people who have described automatic writing. But Pentecostals and Spiritualists inhabit almost completely separated social worlds and really don't cross over at all. So that makes me think there's something there. A spectrum from trance, to automatism, to 'words/concepts sort of bubbling up inside' as I think some channellers have described the feeling, to 'open/standing visions', to meditation...

An interesting thing though is that these seem different communication modes for different purposes. Trance channelling seems to convey deep, informative messages but the 'window' of communication often seems to be for a short time period. Glossolalia seems to be strongly 'bound' to an individual - it doesn't really go away - but it is limited to a set of words and isn't really for communication but for personal... something. And then meditation is probably different again. (I am total crap at meditation, by the way. It's very hard to keep my mind still.)

I feel this is maybe like what St Paul was getting at when he talked about 'different gifts'? I feel like the human race has all these different abilities that we are only just barely starting to understand exist and still don't really have that much understanding of what they're for. They're probably meant to be used in connection, but they're often separated among different religions, even. I feel a bit like an ape standing in front of a computer console: this stuff is probably not a toy, it's probably got a purpose to it. I'm probably doing the equivalent of holding a CD-ROM up to the light and marvelling at the pretty colours. No clue how I get from there to '... and this is what I should do today', other than to just keep doing the ordinary human things, I guess. Get up, make breakfast, go to job, share cat pictures on the internet, hug your family...

Fun fact: many of the tribe who practice glossolalia a lot are completely unaware of any other psychic/spiritual abilities or if they've heard about them, think they're evil. And many of this tribe are also in the tribe who are making (in my opinion) gravely dangerous political decisions right now. I don't understand how any of this works. Shouldn't praying a lot make us more sensitive to others? Make us more open to divine guidance? But it doesn't always seem to work like that. I think we have to use our minds as well as our hearts, but it's often so hard trying to get them to align.

It's been a long road for me so far to come to a sense of ease with channelled books; a few years ago I would have thought of those as 'from the dark side'. I think my preacher brother (the one who sees actual healings, which I don't) still probably does...

Regards, Nate
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Re: It's Not Cold Fusion, but...

Postby re-rose rose » Tue Dec 20, 2016 12:47 am

Nate, thanks for taking time to type all of that out.

I associate the hard ch with German and Hebrew, not so much with Russian. And I know your r/l pair are one of the liquid consonants, but I have no idea how often they occur in historic languages. If you are speaking in Ancient Aramaic, or Sumerian, or some other dead language, it's going to take quite a bit of detective work to discover which one.

"a few years ago I would have thought of those as 'from the dark side'.


We have a whole bunch of mental switches we fear to flip, as if they will open hellish gates that we can never close.

I had no idea how strongly folks are afraid of those switches until I used a guided meditation to destress a class before a math test. One student made it obvious that she was resisting the imagery, and later told me that she believed hypnosis was evil.
I should have realized that some would confuse one with the other, and invited student input before hand, but I didn't.

re: meditation as a whole...as the Greens' point out, it needs to go beyond the alpha state in order to be most beneficial.

Their two step process is apparently a consistent one for launching oneself into theta, as I stumbled upon it years ago, looking for tricks to falling asleep: Let yourself feel heavy, then let yourself feel expanded and woosh...off you go. I have thought of it as the place I go to drop off problems to be solved, or issues to be healed, before sinking into slumber.

I just never associated it with theta, nor knew the supposed benefits of theta meditation until we backed into this subject.

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Re: It's Not Cold Fusion, but...

Postby fruitbat » Tue Dec 20, 2016 3:32 am

Would anyone know how these states are altered by cannabis?
Are they enhanced or diminished?
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